Mini’s Harry Potter Themed Birthday – Party Activities

This is the 2nd of 3 posts detailing a really easy, quick and cheap Harry Potter-themed party that we did for Mini’s 7th birthday. I’ve already told you about how we prepared for the party (and yeah, most of that was in the hour or 2 before the party started because I was so busy making the cake at the last minute…!). In this post I’ll tell you about the party activities and games. To give you a better idea of whether they’d suit you too, they kept 10 little girls aged about 6 years old entertained solidly for 2 hours, including half an hour of eating (edibles are in a separate post).

14d sorting

Yes, yes, even a non-HP fan like me knows that the light pink on the right should be red for Gryffindor, but I’d already used all the red icing up before I hit on the idea

Sorting Hat.  Mini really wanted to sort her guests into Hogwarts Houses. We’d thought about making a sorting hat, but realised it would take far too much time and mucking around with papier-mache. We questioned whether there was even a point to sorting the kids into Houses at all – eg were we going to do team games or award House Points? No. So to my adult mind there was no point. Mini really wanted it to happen, so we did. Still, I’d suggest you think about awarding House Points throughout the party so that there’s a reason to the guests being put into Houses if that’s what you want to do.

Anyway, I adapted a great idea I’d read on a few blogs and made it even simpler. You only need:

  • a packet of plain fairy cakes
  • some small coloured fondant icing circles (cut out from the leftover icings used on the birthday cake)
  • some whipped buttercream icing (also leftover from the cake)

14c sortingSimply put a coloured disk of icing on top of a fairy cake, squirt a blob of whipped buttercream icing over the top to conceal the coloured icing, then put the finished cake on a plate. I sprinkled some white chocolate stars over the top because those little decorations seem to be breeding in my baking ingredients cupboard – I can’t seem to use them up!

The idea is that each witch sits on a step (the same one as the Prisoner of Azkaban mugshot), puts the Sorting Hat on (Professor Baldy’s hat), chooses a cake and then takes a bite. The Hat magically reveals which House the witch belongs to by changing the colour of the icing inside to fit.

The girls thought this was a lot of fun and they were all very patient, waiting in line to try it. Some weren’t mad on the icing, though, and it was useful to have a bucket handy to grab discarded cake…

Pin the Glasses on the Harry Potter. The plan was then to play something quick in the hallway with Professor Baldy supervising while Professor FishFace sorted out the props for the next activity on the kitchen table. So we went for something super-easy that little kids always seem to like: pin something on something! In this case, Pin the Glasses on the Harry Potter.

Maxi had lots of fun the night before painting a brilliant representation of Harry Potter and making 10 pairs of different coloured glasses. The kids were happy being blindfolded by Mini’s new Gryffindor scarf and taking turns to stick their glasses on the picture. There was a lot of innocent sniggering at some glasses looking like hair bows on Harry, and they’d have been happy playing this for lots longer than the 15 minutes it took. The winner got a little packet of chocolate buttons.

If you fancy doing this and don’t want to freehand a picture of Harry Potter without glasses, then Google for and print an image of a young Daniel Radcliffe 😉 Another option would be to pin the scar on the Harry Potter – then you just need little lightning bolt shapes. Or even get the children to mark a zigzag on the picture in different coloured crayons / pens whilst blindfold – easy!

10 Potions Master

Professor Baldy channeling his inner Snape

Potions Class. The activity that me and The Boss spent longest prepping for was Potions Class. And I swear that only took 20 mins of Googling, printing, sticking, emptying cupboards and thinking. To save you the thinking and Googling, read on!

If you have WinZip, then there are some fantastic free potion bottle label printables all over the place, such as this, but I don’t have that application. In a mad panic, I printed out a load of blank food labels and just hand-wrote information all over it. I really didn’t need to – little kids aren’t all that interested in Olde Worlde handwriting on old labels; they’re all about the whizz-bang of bubbles and colours and smells!

The Boss lead the kids in a class. We gathered them around the kitchen table where I’d already laid out a jam-jar and teaspoon each as lab apparatus. The Boss had a lot of ingredients already decanted by his wonderful lab-tech assistant (me), so it was quick and easy:

  • a bottle of clear vinegar (any old kind);
  • a jug of the water that I’d previously cooked a red cabbage in*;
  • a jar of bicarbonate of soda (baking soda);
  • various baking glitters and sprinkles and the like.

11a potions ingredients*I cut our last, manky, old red cabbage from the garden, chopped it up, poured boiling water over it and boiled heck out of it for 10  minutes. I strained the liquid and chucked the cabbage.

Professor Baldy got the kids to carefully pour some of the cabbage-water into their jam-jars and smell it. Then he handed round the bicarbonate of soda (“Shredded Essence of Boy”) and they all oohed and aahed as the water turned distinctly blue! He gave them a bit of spiel about the Truth Potion (vinegar) deciding whether the potion was actually a boy or girl potion: they added it in different proportions and some turned pink again, some stayed bluey-purple. Some of the kids’ potions fizzed and bubbled with the bicarb, too. They all loved the colours and strong smells and the whole hocus-pocus of it.

11b potions ingredientsI collected the jam-jars, rinsed them out, and handed them back so that Professor Baldy could ‘test’ them on their potion-making skills: they were to make a potion of their choice. I got a tub full of 10 random potion labels I’d been able to find via Google and print and cut out. The kids chose one each, stuck their label to their jar with Pritt stick, then inspired by their chosen label, they were unleashed on the contents of my baking cupboard: a decanted carton of pineapple juice, lots of baking glitter sugars that I’d re-labelled things like ‘Wart Dust’, ‘Dried Bogeys’, etc., as well as flour, sugar, the vinegar, cabbage-water and bicarb.

The girls seemed to like these 30 minutes most of all. And I tell you, we adults chortled lots at these lovely, well-brought up girls asking each other politely to kindly pass the bogeys…

Pass the Parcel. You can’t have a birthday party without a game of Pass The Parcel. It’s virtually The Law. So we did! Each layer of wrapping contained individual jelly beans from a packet of Bertie Bott’s Every Flavour Beans, and the prizes in the middle were whole packets of the beans. (Tip: if you want to do this, they can be expensive. You can always pick up packets on the very cheap on eBay).

If you don’t know, these jelly beans come in a range of nice, standard flavours, and also nasty, unusual flavours, like earwax, vomit, soap, grass, etc. Mini had shared a packet the morning before with her sisters (see photos below), so we knew to keep a little plate of fudge handy beside a glass of water to help get rid of the taste of any beans that were too horrendous. And 2 wee girls definitely needed it!:

Make Your Own Wand. In the end, there wasn’t time to do another ‘class’ that we’d planned: Make Your Own Wand. If you want to do it yourself, it’s really easy. Just get lots of brown paper / offcuts of wallpaper / any sturdy paper; scissors; glue and water; paintbrushes; brown and black paints; fake gems; rice; pasta shapes. Just roll up a strip of paper into a quill shape. Paint it with a mix of brown or black paint, PVA glue and water. Then stick shapes or gems to it, and paint again if wished. Let it dry, and there you go!

Next post: the Birthday Tea and Cake